I wrote in my previous post about the Scrum team I’m working in as a ScrumMaster and that we’re closing in on our first release to production. At this stage a lot of the work is related to getting production environments up and running and our user stories have taken on a more technical format and are formed more by the team than the Product Owner. Our PO had a story asking for a production environment but that one was way too fuzzy for the team to take in so they had to break it into smaller stories/technical tasks. A lot of this work was done on the fly during the planning session and we needed to find defintions of done for the stories as they were forming.

The task of finding good definitions of done proved to be harder than anticipated for these stories. After a while I realized that what we were specifying tended to be more of a list of tasks than acceptance criteria. So we backed up the value chain by asking “Why” we wanted to do something and started arriving at better definitions of done. However, the crown jewel was when we were discussing the job of getting outsourced operations to monitor our application. What was the definition of done here? Putting the order for monitoring services in the mail? Getting a reply to our order? Having a signed contract? We weren’t really getting anywhere until all of a sudden one of the team members spoke up:

“I want to turn off one of our services and when I see operations dancing a jig on our doorstep, that’s when we’re done.”

I damn near got a tear in my eye hearing this suggestion. This is the kind of thinking that we need when we measure things. Whether it’s a level of service, quality or productivity we want to measure we always need to begin by looking at what we want to accomplish. We can’t demo usability by showing a pretty UI, we need to put a user in front of the UI to demo usability. We can’t demo quality in number of bugs found, we must demo quality in a fit for use product that is stable under usage and over time. And if we want to demo our ability to handle problems, we can’t do that by waving a contract. We demonstrate our ability to handle problems by handling a problem.

This episode reminded me of a story an aquiantance told me ten years ago about his neighbor. The neighbor had a burglar alarm connected to a security company. The security company promised in their service to arrive at the house within 20 minutes of an alarm. Twice every year this neighbor set the alarm off. He then pulled out a lawn chair, put on ear protections and sat down with a timer in his hand and when the security company arrived after half an hour or fortyfive minutes, he filed a complaint and got the service for free for another six months. This guy knew what the definition of done was; he also waited for operations to dance a jig on his doorstep.

If you want to measure or demo some qualitative aspect, don’t settle for the easy way out and try to quantify it. Put it to the ultimate test, that is the only way you’ll ever know for sure that you’ve done something right.

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